NOTICE OF DATA BREACH

Human Technology and Its Affiliates are posting this substitute notice to provide their patients with information about a data security incident that may have exposed some of their personal information as well as to share resources available to individuals who believe their personal data may be impacted. We take the protection and proper use of your information very seriously. For this reason, we are posting this notice to explain the circumstances of the incident.

What happened?

On or about March 14, 2024, through March 15, 2024, Human Technology Inc., and Its Affiliates, Greer Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc., Murphy’s Orthopedic & Footcare, Inc., and Hi-Tech Prosthetics & Orthotics, Inc., (“Human Technology and Its Affiliates”) suffered a data security incident.  Human Technology and Its Affiliates became aware of this suspicious activity within its environment on March 15, 2024. In response, Human Technology and Its Affiliates promptly launched an investigation into the matter and engaged forensic computer specialists to determine the nature and scope of the incident. Based upon the investigation, it was determined that an unauthorized actor gained access and/or acquired information contained within Human Technology and Its Affiliate’s environment.

As a result, Human Technology and Its Affiliates worked diligently to determine the identity of all individuals whose sensitive and personal information may be at risk. This review was completed on or about May 31, 2024.

What information was involved?

Based upon the forensic investigation it was determined that the following information may have been accessed and/or acquired by the unauthorized actor on the date of the incident: Your name, date of birth, driver’s license or State ID, health insurance information, medical information, passport number, social security number, account number and routing number, taxpayer identification number.

What are we doing?

Human Technology and Its Affiliates promptly took steps to contain, eradicate, remediate and monitor its environment. Such steps included: rebuilding impacted systems, decommissioning legacy systems, global password reset for all accounts, implementation of GeoFencing on the firewall, deploying multi factor authentication and 24/7 EDR monitoring.

While we are not aware of any identity theft or fraud caused by this incident, out of an abundance of caution, we have secured the services of Kroll to provide notification including identity theft protection and monitoring services to individuals at no cost. Kroll is a global leader in risk mitigation and response, and their team has extensive experience helping people who have sustained an unintentional exposure of confidential data. 

Additional resources are available in the below Reference Guide for any individual who believes they may be impacted or who may have questions.

What can individuals do?

Below please find steps individuals can take to protect themselves:

  • Any individual who believes their information may have been impacted by this incident can enroll in complimentary credit monitoring and identity protection services (duration of credit monitoring varies by the State the individual resides in). 
  • Individuals should be on the lookout and regularly monitor the explanation of benefits statements received from their health plan and statements from health care providers, as well as bank and credit card statements, credit reports, and tax returns, to check for any unfamiliar activity.
  • If individuals notice any health care services they did not receive listed on an explanation of benefits statement, they should contact their health plan or doctor immediately.
  • If individuals notice any suspicious activity on bank or credit card statements or on tax returns, they should immediately contact their financial institution and/or credit card company or relevant agency.
  • If an individual believes they are the victim of a crime, they can contact local law enforcement authorities and file a police report.
  • Individuals may have additional rights available to them depending on the state they live in and should refer to the Reference Guide for additional information.

Need more information?

We understand that you may have questions about this incident that are not addressed in this notice. Human Technology and its affiliates have established a dedicated call center to offer additional resources and information to people who believe they may have been affected by this incident. For any questions, please contact the toll-free dedicated assistance line at 866 528-4805, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Central Time, excluding major U.S. holidays. Protecting your information is important to us. We trust that the services we are offering to you demonstrate our continued commitment to you.

REFERENCE GUIDE

Review Your Account Statements

Carefully review statements sent to you from your healthcare providers, insurance company, and financial institutions to ensure that all of your account activity is valid.  Report any questionable charges promptly to the provider or company with which you maintain the account.

Provide Any Updated Personal Information to Your Health Care Provider

Your health care provider’s office may ask to see a photo ID to verify your identity.  Please bring a photo ID with you to every appointment if possible.  Your provider’s office may also ask you to confirm your date of birth, address, telephone, and other pertinent information so that they can make sure that all of your information is up to date.  Please be sure and tell your provider’s office when there are any changes to your information.  Carefully reviewing this information with your provider’s office at each visit can help to avoid problems and to address them quickly should there be any discrepancies.

Order Your Free Credit Report

To order your free annual credit report, visit www.annualcreditreport.com, call toll-free at (877) 322-8228, or complete the Annual Credit Report Request Form on the U.S. Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) website at www.ftc.gov and mail it to Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281.  The three credit bureaus provide free annual credit reports only through the website, toll-free number or request form.

Upon receiving your credit report, review it carefully.  Look for accounts you did not open.  Look in the “inquiries” section for names of creditors from whom you have not requested credit.  Some companies bill under names other than their store or commercial names; the credit bureau will be able to tell if this is the case.  Look in the “personal information” section for any inaccuracies in information (such as home address and Social Security Number). 

If you see anything you do not understand, call the credit bureau at the telephone number on the report. Errors may be a warning sign of possible identity theft.  You should notify the credit bureaus of any inaccuracies in your report, whether due to error or fraud, as soon as possible so the information can be investigated and, if found to be in error, corrected.  If there are accounts or charges you did not authorize, immediately notify the appropriate credit bureau by telephone and in writing.  Information that cannot be explained should also be reported to your local police or sheriff’s office because it may signal criminal activity.

How to Enroll in Kroll’s Credit and Identity Monitoring Services 

While we are not aware of any identity theft or fraud caused by this incident, out of an abundance of caution, we have secured the services of Kroll to provide identity theft protection and monitoring services to affected individuals at no cost (length of time varies by state).  

To enroll in these services you can contact the toll-free dedicated assistance line at 866 528-4805, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Central Time, excluding major U.S. holidays

For more information about Kroll and your Identity Monitoring services you can visit info.krollmonitoring.com.

Monitoring

You should always remain vigilant and monitor your accounts for suspicious or unusual activity.

Contact the U.S. Federal Trade Commission

If you detect any unauthorized transactions in any of your financial accounts, promptly notify the appropriate payment card company or financial institution.  If you detect any incidents of identity theft or fraud, promptly report the matter to your local law enforcement authorities, state Attorney General and the FTC.

 

You can contact the FTC to learn more about how to protect yourself from becoming a victim of identity theft by using the contact information below:

Federal Trade Commission
Consumer Response Center
600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20580
1-877-IDTHEFT (438-4338)
www.ftc.gov/idtheft

Place a Fraud Alert on Your Credit File

There are two types of fraud alerts you can place on your credit report to put your creditors on notice that you may be a victim of fraud—an initial alert and an extended alert. You may ask that an initial fraud alert be placed on your credit report if you suspect you have been, or are about to be, a victim of identity theft. An initial fraud alert stays on your credit report for at least one year. You may have an extended alert placed on your credit report if you have already been a victim of identity theft and you have the appropriate documentary proof. An extended fraud alert stays on your credit report for seven years. You can place a fraud alert on your credit report by calling any one of the toll-free fraud numbers provided below. 

Equifax, PO Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374, www.equifax.com, 1-800-685-1111
Experian, PO Box 2104, Allen, TX 75013, www.experian.com, 1-888-397-3742
TransUnion, PO Box 2000, Chester, PA 19016, www.transunion.com, 1-800-888-4213

Security Freezes

You have the right to request a credit freeze from a consumer reporting agency, free of charge, so that no new credit can be opened in your name without the use of a PIN number that is issued to you when you initiate a freeze.  A security freeze is designed to prevent potential credit grantors from accessing your credit report without your consent.  If you place a security freeze, potential creditors and other third parties will not be able to get access to your credit report unless you temporarily lift the freeze.  Therefore, using a security freeze may delay your ability to obtain credit. 

Unlike a fraud alert, you must separately place a security freeze on your credit file at each credit bureau. To place a security freeze on your credit report you must contact the credit reporting agency by phone, mail, or secure electronic means and provide proper identification of your identity.  The following information must be included when requesting a security freeze (note that if you are requesting a security freeze for your spouse, this information must be provided for him/her as well): (1) full name, with middle initial and any suffixes; (2) Social Security number; (3) date of birth; (4) current address and any previous addresses for the past five years; and (5) any applicable incident report or complaint with a law enforcement agency or the Registry of Motor Vehicles.  The request must also include a copy of a government-issued identification card and a copy of a recent utility bill or bank or insurance statement. It is essential that each copy be legible, display your name and current mailing address, and the date of issue.

Below, please find relevant contact information for the three consumer reporting agencies:

Equifax Security Freeze 

P.O. Box 105788 

Atlanta, GA 30348 equifax.com/personal/credit-report-services/ 

1-800-349-9960 

Experian Security Freeze 

P.O. Box 9554 

Allen, TX 75013 experian.com/freeze/center.html 

1-888-397-3742 

TransUnion Security Freeze 

P.O. Box 160 

Woodlyn, PA 19094 

transunion.com/credit-freeze 

1-888-909-8872 

 

Additional Important Information

For residents of New Mexico, Hawaii, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and Wyoming: It is recommended by state law that you remain vigilant for incidents of fraud and identity theft by reviewing credit card account statements and monitoring your credit report for unauthorized activity.

For residents of Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Oregon, and West Virginia:

It is required by state laws to inform you that you may obtain a copy of your credit report, free of charge, whether or not you suspect any unauthorized activity on your account. You may obtain a free copy of your credit report from each of the three nationwide credit reporting agencies. To order your free credit report, please visit www.annualcreditreport.com, or call toll-free at 1-877-322-8228. You can also order your annual free credit report by mailing a completed Annual Credit Report Request Form (available at https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0155-free-credit-reports) to: Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA, 30348-5281.

For residents of Vermont: If you do not have internet access but would like to learn more about how to place a security freeze on your credit report, contact the Vermont Attorney General’s Office at 802-656-3183 (800-649-2424 toll free in Vermont only).

For residents of New Mexico: Individuals interacting with credit reporting agencies have rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  We encourage you to review your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act by visiting https://files.consumerfinance.gov/f/documents/bcfp_consumer-rights-summary_2018-09.pdf, or by requesting information in writing from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street N.W., Washington, DC 20552.

For Residents of Washington, D.C.: You can obtain information about steps to take to avoid identity theft from the Office of the Attorney General for the District of Columbia at: 441 4th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001; 202-727-3400; www.oag.dc.gov.

For residents of Iowa: State law advises you to report any suspected identity theft to law enforcement or to the Attorney General.

For residents of Oregon: State laws advise you to report any suspected identity theft to law enforcement, including the Attorney General, and the Federal Trade Commission.

For residents of Colorado, Rhode Island, Illinois, and New York: You can obtain information from the Federal Trade Commission about fraud alerts, security freezes, and steps you can take toward preventing identity theft.

For residents of Maryland, and North Carolina: You can obtain information from the Maryland and North Carolina Offices of the Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission about fraud alerts, security freezes, and steps you can take toward preventing identity theft.

Maryland Office of the Attorney General Consumer Protection Division, 200 St. Paul Place, Baltimore, MD 21202 1-888-743-0023 www.oag.state.md.us

Rhode Island Office of the Attorney General Consumer Protection, 150 South Main Street, Providence, RI 02903 1-401-274-4400 www.riag.ri.gov 

North Carolina Office of the Attorney General Consumer Protection Division, 9001 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-9001 1-877-566-7226 www.ncdoj.com

Federal Trade Commission Consumer Response Center, 600 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Washington, DC 20580 1-877-IDTHEFT (438-4338) www.ftc.gov/idtheft

New York Office of Attorney General Consumer Frauds & Protection, The Capitol, Albany, NY 12224 1-800-771-7755 https://ag.ny.gov/consumer-frauds/identity-theft

For residents of Massachusetts and Rhode Island: It is required by state law that you are informed of your right to obtain a police report if you are a victim of identity theft.

For residents of all states:

Fraud Alerts: You can place fraud alerts with the three credit bureaus by phone and online with Equifax (https://assets.equifax.com/assets/personal/Fraud_Alert_Request_Form.pdf); TransUnion (https://www.transunion.com/fraud-alerts); or Experian (https://www.experian.com/fraud/center.html). A fraud alert tells creditors to follow certain procedures, including contacting you, before they open any new accounts or change your existing accounts.  For that reason, placing a fraud alert can protect you, but also may delay you when you seek to obtain credit. As of September 21, 2018, initial fraud alerts last for one year. Victims of identity theft can also get an extended fraud alert for seven years. The phone numbers for all three credit bureaus are contained within this notice.